Margaret Haggart, Wendy Morrison

MARGARET HAGGART,
SOPRANO
WENDY MORRISON,
PIANO

Sunday 3ra August 2008 . 2pm
ST. PETER’S PARISH HALL
GISBORNE STREET, EAST MELBOURNE
(opp. St. Patrick’s Cathedral) Melways 2F KJ

Meet the Artists

Melbourne soprano Margaret Haggart’s opera and concert career began in 1972, when Welsh National Opera contracted her to perform the Queen of the Night and Gilda. Principal roles followed with major UK companies, and in Chile, France, Italy, New Zealand, USA, Singapore and all Australian companies and festivals.

Margaret’s repertoire (over 90 roles) includes Donna-Anna, Konstanze, Ellettra, Vitellia by Mozart; Violetta, Abigaille, Leonora, Helene and Lady Macbeth by Verdi; Lauretta, Musetta, Butterfly and Turandot by Puccini. Title roles include Merry Widow, Lucretia Borgia and Katja Kabnova. Margaret sang world premiere performances of Fly (Conyngham), Selfish Giant (Easton), Aspern Papers (Kurd), and Love Burns (Koehne). Musical theatre roles include Carlotta in Phantom of the Opera, Sally in Follies in Concert and Mrs. Lovett in Sweeney Todd. Concert performances (in UK and Australia) include works by Beethoven, Brahms, Gorecki, Handel, Haydn, Mendelssohn, Menotti, Mozart, Orff, Rossini, Shostakovich, Verdi and Villa-Lobos.

Margaret is currently on the Board of Melbourne Opera, and on the Committee of the Mietta Foundation. She is also a Patron of the Music Lover’s Society.

Wendy Morrison, pianist and composer. Wendy graduated from the University of Melbourne, where she studied with Ronald Farren-Price. She won a number of state and national competitions including the City of Sydney Pianoforte Scholarship and the ABC Instrumental and Vocal Competition. She continued her studies in London where she was awarded the prestigious Welsford Smithers Scholarship and a full scholarship from the Royal College of Music in order to undertake a Masters in Performance Studies with Professor Peter Wallfisch. Wendy also studied advanced technique and teaching methodology with Italian specialist Lidia Baldecchi-Arcuri before establishing a career as a soloist, accompanist and chamber player, performing in Australia, Italy, France, England, Ireland and Cuba.
Her first move into composition dates to the early ’90s, and she has since collaborated with visual artists, poets, composers, dancers and video-artists in Australia and Europe. In 2000 she was a major prize winner in the Onassis Foundation’s First International Competition for the Composition of Music for Choreography.

Order of Program

W.A. MOZART
Alleluia – Exsultate
PorgiAmor – Marriage of Figaro
Der Zauberer – The Magician (1785) poem by C. F. Weisse
Ridente La Calma – Peace and Content (1775?) poet unknown
Un Moto di Gioia – Joyful Fluttering (1789) poet Lorenzo da Ponte?

MICHAEL BERTRAM
Song Cycle, / Will Write to You
Three love songs for soprano to poems by Rupert Brooke & Robert Graves
1. Oh Lovers Parted
2. 1 Will Write
3. Bird of Paradise

CALVIN BOWMAN
Three songs to poems by Walter de la Mare
1. Silver
2. Solitude
3. The Ride-by-Nights

WENDY MORRISON
Son de negros en Cuba, poem by Garcia Lorca
U Puntu Fermu, poem by Lio Tomarchio
Ceremonial Song for the Cleansing of the Wind, poem by Keith Harrison

INTERVAL

G. CARLO MENOTTI: The Telephone

Lucy – Margaret Haggart
Ben – Robert Tuttleby

• Overture
• Oh! Just what I wanted
• Hello! Hello? (Lucy’s Aria)
• That was Margaret
• Try again and again
• It all began on a Sunday
• Oh – where has he gone?

Robert Tuttleby and Margaret Haggart met in 19 – never mind – at the Melbourne University Conservatorium Opera School. He played Puccini’s Gianni Schicchi to her Lauretta, supposedly his DAUGHTER! Opera requires the willing suspension of disbelief. Her singing of THAT aria while weeping on his trouser-cuffs evoked rapturous applause from a packed audience. Together again in a production of Verdi’s Nabucco, her Abigail showed formidable promise. She tore off to international celebrity while he kept his day job and mortgage and sang, acted directed about town whenever and wherever opportunity presented – and still does so. He later heard her ‘Queen of the Night’ for the English National Opera’s The Magic Flute. The promise had been realised.

For Robert music and theatre have been much-loved recreations and he is delighted to share a scene again with a deservedly acclaimed friend and her accomplished pianist.